Squaring the Culture




"...and I will make justice the plumb line, and righteousness the level;
then hail will sweep away the refuge of lies,
and the waters will overflow the secret place."
Isaiah 28:17

02/04/2010 (9:14 am)

Take Your Prozac and Get Back To Your Toll Booth

Here’s a review of James Cameron’s film, Avatar, that’s more worthwhile than the film itself in my humble opinion. It’s 10 minutes long, and it’s just part 1 of 2, but seriously, this is entertaining. Content warning, though; R-rated for language and a few, grisly references to the reviewer’s own, psychopathic crimes. It’s his schtick.

The best spot in the entire review starts at 1:22, with “my answering machine.”

Here’s the link to Part 2.

If you have not discovered RedLetterMedia yet, consider this a long-overdue introduction. This guy postures as some old, creepy, half-educated psychopath who happens to like sci-fi-ish films, but he’s actually a guy who knows the film industry pretty doggone well, and his video editing skills are first-rate. His 7-installment review of Star Wars I: The Phantom Menace was a primer on story and plot construction. If you haven’t seen that yet, I do recommend that you treat yourself, so here’s a link to the first installment. But I’ll warn you: 7 10-minute sessions = 70 minutes of film, and it’s R-rated like this is, for the same reasons. Don’t say I didn’t warn you.

As to Avatar, I think I’ll pass. I don’t care how sweet the special effects are, if I listen to one more ball-numbing recitation of how awful white men, industrial society, and greedy corporations are, I may have to go Rambo on Massachusetts. I think my IQ drops 1.3% every time I watch that drivel from another neo-Marxist Hollywood capitalist (how do they manage being both?) Doesn’t it tell these self-righteous Church Ladies something that in order to get a society to swallow their “truth,” they have to de-educate people to the point of not being able to follow the directions on a frakkin’ can of soup????

The title of this post comes from a comment at the end of part 2 of the review that I regard as particularly appropriate: if you’re one of those who are distressed because Pandora is not a real place and you can’t go there, please — take your Prozac, get back to your toll booth, and stop giving those Hollywood snake-oil salesmen your money. I promise you’ll be happier.

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4 Comments »

February 4, 2010 @ 6:14 pm #

If you over simplify anything you can make it sound silly. Take golf, if you simplify the game down to its simplest form it passes silly and goes directly to stupid. Paying lots of money to walk or drive around a grass field, whacking a small ball with a stick, and then chasing it, whacking it again and again until you finely get close enough to a hole in the ground with a flag sticking out of it so that you can whack it one more time to make the ball go into the hole is stupid. And, you do this 18 times. In my humble opinion watching a movie like Avatar is a much better use of one’s time and costs one hell of a lot less.

Avatar is science fiction, and yes you need to be able to suspend believe in order to really enjoy it. I happen to like Sci-Fi, do did my dad, on the other hand my mother didn’t, but did read murder mysteries like they were going out of style. Both are an escape from the hum drum of our daily lives.

Yes some of the characters were very one dimensional and got more so in the second half of the movie, it happens. And yes, I wish the director had made more of an effort to keep it real, but it was still fun to watch. As for primitive humans being brutal why must we assume the Na’vi were human primitive. Why couldn’t they be advanced but on a different evolutionary track. And why is it so farfetched to believe that humans might have trouble relating to a truly alien species; especially if understanding them would get in the way of large profits.

I enjoyed it and I hope to see more done with 3D technology.

February 4, 2010 @ 8:53 pm #

I enjoyed Avatar, in spite of the obnoxious PC preaching needlessly inserted. I’ve developed an immunity over the years. Avatar’s flaws strike me as being of little consequence– both within the movie and in the real world. It was great escapist entertainment.

As insightful as the RedLetterMedia guy was (and he *was* insightful) I found him more difficult to put up with than the movie(s) he was trying to insult. Too bad too. He royally destroyed The Phantom Menace in just two of his seven part review. But he also lost me with his attempt at humor. Phil clearly warned me, so I’m not complaining. Just making a point about . . . the cure being worse than the disease in the case of that review.

Below are some more reviews of Avatar which I thought were interesting. (I guess Avatar is not only going to be the most watched movie . . . it’s going to be the most reviewed too.)

http://www.reasonablefaith.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=5887

http://townhall.com/columnists/JonahGoldberg/2009/12/30/avatar_and_the_faith_instinct

http://www.christiansciencefiction.blogspot.com

February 4, 2010 @ 9:25 pm #

And why is it so farfetched to believe that humans might have trouble relating to a truly alien species; especially if understanding them would get in the way of large profits.

Tell me, in real life, how many instances you can name of large corporations deliberately and knowledgeably committing murders in order to obtain large profits. I really want to hear if there are legitimate instances of this.

February 5, 2010 @ 11:46 am #

Well Phil, I seem to remember something about Briton going to war with China so that they could keep selling them Opium after China tried to outlaw it in their country. Or for that matter how about tobacco? How many years did the tobacco company’s know the harmful effects of their products while arguing that there was no proof that it caused cancer. Phil, human history is replete with putting profits first.

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